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Kayaking Sleuth



I am very proud of my third son, Mikael. Of all my boys, he's the adventurer and, in his mind, the more adventure the better. The things he's done would make most parents want to chain him to the bedpost to keep him safe, but he'd find a way out, somehow.

Before the ice had melted on the many rivers here in Winnipeg, Mikael bought himself a kayak. He got a good deal, which helped, though he made a special order for a PDF (personal floatation device, which, apparently is not quite the same as a lifejacket, though they serve similar functions).

As soon as the PDF arrived, he was itching to go out on the river--despite the current flood conditions. His first attempt was doing laps on a creek to get accustomed to the kayak but his second day took him out on the river itself. Before long, he was out kayaking for about three hours a day--a great workout.

This kayak is going to be a lifesaver for him. He's been battling severe depression all winter, unable to work or do much of anything; but you should see how animated he gets when he talks about the kayak. I can see him, once the rivers are safer, spending all day, every day, this summer, exploring the rivers and creeks in and around Winnipeg and beyond and loving every minute of it. I can't think of any therapy that could help as much. I'm excited for him.

Two days ago he was on the Assiniboine River near the Moray Bridge when, to his surprise, he found a car in the water--just the roof rack showing. He said it was a nice car too. He had phoned me to check in as I've requested and told me about the car, so I advised him to call the non-emergency police line. He was told to stay with the car until someone arrived. Four fire trucks arrived! Exciting stuff!

A Winnipeg Free Press cameraman happened to be there to take a photo of Mikael in his kayak, talking to the water-rescue team with the car between them and put it in the next day's paper. Global TV reported about it on the evening news.

Mikael is a cool "kid." I love having adult sons.

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About the Author

DEBBIE HAUGHLAND CHAN
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CANADA

I'm married (35 years in December 2008) with four grown sons. I love my city (Winnipeg) and my country (Canada) and promote them both to whoever will listen. God (through Jesus Christ) is the biggest part of my life. I am learning to let him take control of all areas--though I do better at this some times more than others.

I have written a book that's recently been published about part of my journey with God. In it I tell how God confronted me with the same-sex attraction issues I've struggled with all my adult life and how he led me through them to a deeper and more meaningful relationship with him. God is amazing—his forgiveness, his love, his movement in our lives when we allow him and so much more. I suspect God will never run out of things to teach me or ways to make me grow and that’s a good thing (though often very painful).

I suppose I can say that what gives me the greatest pleasure in life is telling others about…

Memories of Mikael Vincent Tien Doe Chan

Reviews of Searching for Love

If you have read the book, I would love to hear your thoughts on it. You may e-mail me at debbiehaughland@gmail.com or post them in the comments section below.

A Real Testimony
I finished your book. A real testimony to what God does for us.
Leona March 3, 2009
I Had Tears Coming

I sat down to read it about a week later and ended up finishing it the same night. At first I admit I was a little bored and thought that the whole book was about a battle all in your mind, but as I continued reading this creeping thought came over me of a different...struggle in my own life, that I would never in my right mind have shared with anyone accept maybe God. I've mentioned your book to a few people because it stirs up age-old controversies that I have myself argued and wondered about, namely about whether or not homosexuality can be cured or just managed like alcoholism--you just have to stay away from temptation. I noticed at the end of your book that your struggle story …